The amount of stray and wild (feral) cats that populate areas such as alley ways and open areas not regularly tended to, such as lots and backyards, equals numbers reaching tens of millions. The difference between stray and feral cats is that the former consists of cats that started out with an owner but have been separated at some point while the latter were born and raised in the wild. Both of these kinds of cats tend to ruin gardens with its fecal matter, sit around on cars and other vehicles, eat food intended for other pets, urinate on street posts and the like, and cause disturbances with their incessant meowing and fights. They spread diseases and parasites such as fleas and ticks while roaming around to other pets or even children, which makes it even more urgent to know how to get rid of cats. 

How to Keep Unwanted Cats Out of Your Property

The following points explains how to get rid of cats in an easy and friendly manner:
1

Do not feed the cats

This action conditions them to stay as it is easier to obtain food. This can lead to even more cats appearing. Do not leave pet food out in open areas that cats can reach. Do not feed its potential prey, such as birds or pet mice, either for the cat may eat these, too. Secure garbage in proper disposal bins with lids shut tight to ensure the cats cannot go through what they can find.

2

Eliminate potential homes and make it hard to dig

Cats find shelter in a warm, dry place to ensure protection from the dangers of the outdoors. If they are unable to find a suitable place, they will move on. Put a fence on your deck or porch, and keep openings closed and sealed off.

Cats usually dig the soil before they use it as a litter box. Discourage them by lining your garden with chicken wire

3

Obtain motion-activated sprinklers

Devices like motion sensing lights, can detect stimuli when the signal between the source and the receptor of light is disrupted. Cats do not like being surprised with bursts of water so they will avoid passing through that place a second time. Aim the device opposite to areas where it will be unnecessarily detected, such as driveways and sidewalks where passers-by can set it off.

4

Make use of repellents

Although cats like strong odors, such as that emitted by fish, they dislike others. Cats have a particular disliking for citrus scented things, so you can use orange and lemon peels. Other common house hold wastes, such as coffee grounds and essential oils that contain citronella, lavender, and eucalyptus are also known to repel cats. Simply spray or scatter these on the perimeter of your house and backyard. You can also cut out the spiky parts of certain house hold items, like carpet runners, and put these on the areas cats usually lounge on, such as windowsills, porches, or other furniture outside your house. Cat sprays commercially marketed are also available for long lasting and heavy duty effects. 

5

Consider natural means of scaring cats

Doing this is usually effective enough to keep cats away from your property. Get a dog and place rubber snakes where the cat will see it. The presence of their natural enemies will ward them off.

6

Apply the urine of animals that prey on cats

Use the urine of foxes or coyotes to keep feral cats away. This method is not recommended for those who live in rainy areas and require constant reapplication. 

7

Use ammonia

Cats use gardens or soft dirt as litter boxes so apply a solution consisting of one part “Parsons Ammonia” and one part water. Place it in a shallow dish in these areas. The smell of this will make the cats go way because they dislike the smell. You can also spray this in areas where cats frequent. 

8

Apply pepper or pepper spray around the area

This bothers cats while they are grooming by giving them spicy paws. The cats will eventually learn that this feeling is caused by your place and will soon leave. Apply these wherever you see the cats like under your porch, at the back of you patio, or in your shed.

9

Use cat traps

They are most humane and works best in getting rid of cats for those who want long-term effects. After catching them, have the cats spayed or neutered. Acquire a cat trap, either a plastic or metal trap, with a door. Place bait such as sardines, tuna, or cat food, and put the trap on a passage way that cats frequently use in your neighborhood. Once caught, do not let it out, as feral cats are known to bite or scratch when scared. Instead, use a blanket to cover the trap and calm down the cat. 

10

Contact animal control or your local humane society

This may be the quickest way on how to get rid of cats. Do this if you notice that the number of feral cats in your neighborhood is increasing. They will either handle the problem by themselves or help you by bringing traps to put around areas where these cats gather most.

11

Take feral cats to animal shelters

Because feral cats have lived all their life in the wild, domestication of these would prove difficult given their wild nature. Kittens are easier to deal with as they can still be trained and be adopted. Have kittens tested for health issues at a local animal shelter before putting them up for adoption. Using live traps, adult cats can be captured, spared or neutered. There are some programs being offered by the Humane Society. Through these, you are able to rent traps, which encourage you to catch the cat, and bring it to the office of this organization. They then spay or neuter the animal and put it back in the wild. 

Tips
  • Look for the owner. If you know that the cat belongs to someone, call that person or anyone you think is associated with them. Be nice to the person, and ask about the health of the cat, telling them that you care about what they have to say. Tell them about the problems they have caused you and recommend a possible solution.
  • Consider the presence of cats when landscaping. Cats are attracted to mint plants. They may also like certain types of honeysuckle, which brings about reactions similar to that of catnip.
  • Do not harm the cat. This is cruel and inhumane, not to mention it is illegal in several states.
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  • JulieDec.4 15:29
    This is why, if you choose to have a cat as a pet, it is your responsibility to care of that animal. Do not allow them out to roam the area and use my yard where my grandchildren play as a litter box. They have totally ruined outdoor furniture, not to mention, so many are not neuteredand have kittens everywhere only to fend for themselves. These people are not animal lovers they have them for the convience of not having to be fully responsible for them. If you have a cat, please keep it inside. Its not anyone elses responsibility to take care of it.don't tell me to use sprays or anything else to deter them, keep them in your house where they belong. There ate so many kittens hete now. I have called a local humane society to collect them. If the adult cats are taken, i guess you should have kept them inside.
  • Patricia CornettNov.30 03:34
    Also I'd like to add my tenant across the street has cats which she had no permission for, kind of late now. I know there was at least 4 or 5 in the house. I counted 11 cats outside last week. Ready to lose my mind!
  • Patricia CornettNov.30 03:31
    My sister in law next door decided to allow 3 kittens that were dropped off in the neighborhood for her granddaughter. They will remain outdoors. We talked about them damaging my property, patio screen, etc. She tells me they were tearing up hers and I should barricade my deck. Seriously! What am I to do?
  • SONIA EVANSNov.28 06:44
    We have a small cat about 6 months old very timid, but he likes going out. However there is two really nasty cats that come in out garden porch. They fight with our small cat. Causing him to bleed. Any ideas on how to let my small cat to know it is his home and his smell. If I do these listed below will he not be able to smell the sent to get home . Any ideas
  • RobertOct.30 02:34
    My 13 year old cat just passed we have our two year old cat who we still let outside.Simba (two yearold) is having problems with neighborhood cat could it be his older brother is nolonger marking territory.
  • GaryOct.29 15:16
    We have a couple of Siberian Husky's. Nuff said? No cats, no rats, no mice, I've seen them go airborne and nail birds that fly down to screw with them.
  • KentOct.16 21:03
    We had three feral pregnant cats dropped in our neighborhood early June. They had eleven kittens only one of which we've been able to socialize. The FCS will only spay and neuter if we trap, get fixed and return to our property. In our area no agencies are doing relocations at this time. The Humane Society will only take socialized cats. We are open to suggestions.
  • DonnaOct.12 17:20
    We've had a "wild" cat for over two years now. I had her spayed once she had kittens. Only one survived due to hawks, but mostly owls. We kept the one who survived and was going to get this one fixed as well until SHE become pregnant. (These cats have finally trusted me enough to just touch their heads. I welcome them in all honesty because we see no mice is our shop and the snake situation has improved a lot.) Getting back to younger cat... She brought her kittens close to our home so I know they are old enough to be weaned. I'm setting a trap for the mom now. She will be spayed and have rabies shot. What am I to do with these "wild" kittens??? Two is fine.. Five, no way!! Our shelter will put them down; but honestly doesn't want them at all, our cat shelter of sort won't take them, and they hiss and slap at me when I try to bring them food. Trapping them would be fine if I had a place to bring them. I may have homes for them IF they weren't wild. I won't be able to keep them from their mom once she returns. Any suggestions?
  • Peopke HaterOct.12 09:48
    Y'all are bunch of pussy ass cry babies. Sounds like a scared bunny. Fuck you all
  • sue mitchelOct.11 04:51
    I have dealing with ferals, strays and abandoned cats for some time now. I live in a packed housing complex and there was TNR done before I got here but I cant identify any one taking care of the colony. I took over putting some food out after a neighbor who did so moved away. The cats got really desperate and tried to find out what food and water my cat was getting constant coming into our yard and trying to get into the house...People have told me to just stop feeding them and they will go away. We live in a semi industrial area with chain link fences, major roads, and train tracks surrounding us. They do not just go way. They just get really desperate and do wild things to service. TNR is only workable in limited situations. Feral cats should not be turned out into the wild ever and they should not be turned lose in neighborhoods without a guardian. In both cases many cats still suffer, leave fecal matter and reduce bird and other wildlife populations. I am very sorry to say that we need to reverse the newer no kill policy and allow shelters to do what they can to adopt out what they can and just euthanize the others. ASPCA can try and create sensible colonies, if there is such a thing. We long ago stopped letting allow our dog situation to be like this in most places. It's time to deal with cats for real.
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